St Bride’s Church, Fleet Street – where the tiered wedding cake began!

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

St Bride’s Church, Fleet Street

The name St Bride’s for a church off Fleet Street could not be more apt, because it plays an important role in today’s wedding culture.

While the name of St Bride comes from St Bridgit or St Bride of Kildare – a druidic slave and daughter of an Irish prince, who was born in 453. She gave away so many of her father’s possessions, he eventually allowed her to follow her religious calling. She is marked by a feast day, when it is customary to donate to the poor and a cake is baked for her travels.

The current St Bride’s was built by Sir Christopher Wren (1633-1723) in 1672, one of the first he designed as the City of London was rebuilt following the Great Fire Of London. It is thought to be the seventh church to stand on the site since the 6th century, with the Great Fire potentially destroying one dating back to the 15th century. The previous church was where the famous diarist Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) was baptised in 1633 and was mentioned in his diary entries concerning the great fire. Although the main church was open for worship from 1674, the tower and steeple weren’t complete until 1703.

The steeple, consisting of four tiers, each diminishing in size the higher they are, was originally 234ft high, but lost 8ft in 1764 due to a lightning strike. After St Paul’s Cathedral, St Bride’s was Wren’s tallest church and was prominent on the London’s then-skyline.

St Brides Cake 5050 © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012 and Ashley Jane Cakes

St Bride’s steeple is said to have inspired the design for the modern wedding cake (right photo – © Ashley Jane Cakes)

At weddings, it is commonplace to expect a tiered cake as the centrepiece of the reception, with everyone grabbing their cameras or iPhones to capture the iconic cutting of the cake by the bride and groom.

The dessert at weddings were originally a stack of cakes, then a bride’s pie, before the bride and groom had their own separate cakes. Just like the traditional colour of a bride’s wedding dress, the white icing was meant to symbolise purity.

However, it was pastry chef William Rich (1755-1812), who lived on Ludgate Hill in late 18th century London, who was said to be responsible for the tiered wedding cake we know today. Living a stone’s throw from St Bride’s, he found inspiration for making a cake for his own marriage to Susannah Prichard by looking at the tiered steeple.

Amazingly, the steeple survived World War II, despite the actual church being fire bombed by the Luftwaffe on 29 December 1940 (the same night Wren’s Christ Church Greyfriars was bombed – with only the steeple surviving again). By now, the church had been embraced by the journalists and editors of Fleet Street, who financially contributed to the church’s rebuilding in the Fifties, with the building being Grade I listed in 1950. Despite the damage, the bombing did uncover the 6th century foundations of an earlier Saxon church on the site, which can be visited on tours.

  • St Bride’s Church, Fleet Street, EC4Y 8AU. Nearest tube: Blackfriars or City Thameslink overground. St Bride’s Church is open for worship and visits. Please check their website for more information.

Many thanks to the talented proprietor of Ashley Jane Cakes – a caterer located in Lancs – for allowing me to use a photograph of one of her wedding cake designs.

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

Still dominating the skyline: The view of St Bride’s from Ludgate Hill on a
stunning September evening


For other posts on Sir Christopher Wren’s life and buildings read…

For more of Metro Girl’s blog posts on London history, click here.

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About LondonMetroGirl

Media professional who was born, brought up and now works in London. My blog is a guide to London - what's on, festivals, history, restaurant reviews and attractions, as well as the odd travel piece. All images on my blog are © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl, unless otherwise specified. Do not use without seeking permission first.

Posted on 9 July 2012, in Architecture, History, London and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

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