A bit of bling amongst the green: The glistening Albert Memorial in Hyde Park

Albert Memorial © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

The Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens stands as a monument to a prince by his devastated queen

Albert Memorial © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

A gilt bronze statue of Prince Albert seated while holding a catalogue of the Great Exhibition

Of all our monarchs over the past 1,000 years, Queen Victoria is one of Britain’s most famous and iconic. During her reign of 63 years, the country was in the middle of a great change due to the Industrial Revolution. Although she was only 18 when she became Queen following the death of her uncle William IV, many of us picture her as an elderly widow dressed in black. Of course, the reason for her black clothes was her decades of deep mourning for her late consort, Prince Albert, who died at the age of 42.

Following Prince Albert’s death in 1861, his grieving wife ordered his legacy to be enshrined both in Britain and across the Empire. The novelist Charles Dickens actually commented to his friend John Leech in a letter: ‘If you should meet an accessible cave anywhere in the neighbourhood, to which a hermit could retire from the memory of Prince Albert and testimonials to the same, pray let me know it.’ This is where we come to the Albert Memorial and Royal Albert Hall – a Taj Mahal of sorts from the Queen. Us Brits aren’t known for flashy, gold monuments, so tourists may well find it a surprise to see the glimmering Albert Memorial standing in Kensington Gardens.

Ahead of the Royal Albert Hall’s existence, Albert had proposed an entertainment venue on the site following the success of the Great Exhibition of 1851. However, he died before work began, with the Queen deciding the venue should be titled the Royal Albert Hall, instead of the earlier, rather boring title Central Hall of Arts and Sciences, after laying the foundation stone.

Albert Memorial close up © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

Golden canopy: A mosaic of an allegorical figure representing the art of architecture

Albert Memorial © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

The allegorical sculptures of the Americas (right) – on a bison – and Africa (left) – on a camel

Albert Memorial © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

Costly: The Albert Memorial finally opened in 1872 at an estimated cost of £120,000

However, the Albert Memorial was always part of the plan following the Prince’s death. In 1862, the Lord Mayor at the time headed a committee to find a suitable design for a public lasting memorial, which had to include a statue of the Prince, under the Queen’s orders. Eventually, noted Victorian architect Sir George Gilbert Scott submitted the winning design – which demonstrated the Prince’s passions for the arts and sciences.

After much delays – some due to the rising public costs – the 176 foot tall Albert Memorial was officially opened by the Queen in 1872, although Albert’s statue wasn’t ‘seated’ until three years later. Construction cost around £120,000, equivalent to £10million in today’s money.

Rather unusually for the period, the statue of Prince Albert – made of gilt bronze – was seated, rather than standing. In one of his hands is a catalogue of the Great Exhibition, which had been organised by the Prince. Above the statue, is a Gothic canopy featuring mosaics depicting allegorical figures of the arts – painting, poetry, sculpture and architecture. Also adorned on the sides are eight statues representing Christian virtues, including faith, hope and charity.

At the base of the canopy are four white sculptures depicting Victorian industries and sciences, including agriculture, commerce, engineering and manufacturing. Situated further from the statue are four more sculpture sets depicting four continents Europe, Asia, Americas and Africa. A group of people and products associated with the continent sit on four different animals – a cow, camel, bison and bull.

Albert Memorial © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

Wildlife: The allegorical sculpture of Asia (left) with an elephant and Europe (right) with a bull

Over the years, the memorial saw some decline, and spent many decades black instead of gold. Prior to its restoration and re-gilding in the early 2000s, English Heritage discovered the black coating on Albert’s statue pre-dated the war and believe it may have been painted as such following pollution damage to the gold, not in an attempt to hide the landmark from the enemy during the two World Wars as had been previously thought.

  • The Albert Memorial is located in Kensington Gardens, directly across Kensington Road from the Royal Albert Hall. It is open and free to visit during park hours. Nearest stations: High Street Kensington, Hyde Park Corner, South Kensington or Gloucester Road.
© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2012

The memorial stands opposite the Royal Albert Hall


For a post on another Sir George Gilbert Scott’s creation in London, read REVIEW: Afternoon tea at The Gilbert Scott at St Pancras.

Or to read about his grandson Sir Giles Gilbert Scott’s creations, click A look inside Battersea Power Station or the story behind the red phone box.

For more of Metro Girl’s history posts, click here.

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About Metro Girl

Media professional who was born, brought up and works in London. My blog is a guide to London - what's on, festivals, history, reviews and attractions, as well as the odd travel piece. All images on my blog are © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl, unless otherwise specified. Do not use without seeking permission first.

Posted on 30 December 2012, in Architecture, History, London, Tourist Attractions and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

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