A king’s country escape… in the middle of Rotherhithe: Manor House of Edward III

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

The foundations of King Edward III’s manor house still stands today in Rotherhithe, over 600 years later

There are many royal London residences past and present visited by tourists today, such as Buckingham Palace and Hampton Court Palace. However, not all monarchy’s abodes have survived the test of time. The remains of one such royal residence can still be seen today, and in an area somewhat off the usual tourist trail.

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

The house was once surrounded by a moat, but has rather drier enclaves these days

The foundations of King Edward III’s (1312 – 1377) manor house stands near the River Thames in Rotherhithe. With the grass surrounding the ruins dipped low, you could easily imagine where the former moat used to flow around it. The house was built as a country escape outside the City of London by the King in 1353. At the time, the land upon which the foundations were laid was a low-lying island surrounded by marshland. The original manor house comprised of several stone buildings around a court. Water flowed around three sides of the complex so the king could arrive by boat along the Thames. On site included a gatehouse, hall with grand fireplace, kitchens and the king’s private chambers.

Although many royal residences were established as bases for hunting, Rotherhithe had no royal park so this function was ruled out. However, King Edward III was known as a keen falconer, with some historians believing he used the manor house as a base for falconry over the river or surrounding marshland.

Following Edward’s death, the waterline changed in the decades that followed, so by the late 16th century, the south bank of the river had reclaimed some of the Thames, pushing the waterline north so a road ran alongside it. However, the moat remained and eventually surrounded the manor house on all four sides. The Crown sold the property to private owners and it was known as ‘the moted place’. In the 17th century, there was a pottery on the site, followed by warehouses during the 18th and 19th centuries. In 1907, the façade of the north wall of the house had actually been incorporated into a warehouse building. The warehouses were eventually demolished in the 1980s as part of a redevelopment plan, giving archaeologists at the Museum Of London the chance to excavate and restore the site in 1985. Fortunately, the remains weren’t rebuilt over and are visible to the public today to visit.

Metro Girl likes: While you’re in the area, check out the nearby Angel pub, with an outdoor terrace overlooking the Thames.

  • Bermondsey Wall East, Rotherhithe, SE16. Nearest station: Bermondsey or Rotherhithe.
© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

The north wall of the manor house was reused in subsequent buildings, including warehouses in the early 20th century


 To read about the Medieval ruins of Winchester Palace, just over 30 minutes walk away, click here.

To read about Metro Girl’s visit to the Thames Tunnel built by Brunel, click here.

For more Metro Girl’s history posts, click here.

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About LondonMetroGirl

Media professional who was born, brought up and now works in London. My blog is a guide to London - what's on, festivals, history, restaurant reviews and attractions, as well as the odd travel piece. All images on my blog are © Memoirs Of A Metro Girl, unless otherwise specified. Do not use without seeking permission first.

Posted on 26 July 2014, in Architecture, History, London and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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