Blog Archives

Immerse yourself in a colourful wonderland as Colourscape returns to Wembley

Be entertained by musicians and dancers as you walk through a tunnel of sound and light.

© Colourscape at Wembley Park

Colourscape comes to Wembley Park this Easter

IMPORTANT UPDATE 16/03/20: Due to the Covid-19 virus, Colourscape has been postponed. All ticket holders should receive an automatic refund in the coming days. If you have not received a refund by the end of the week please contact KX Tickets directly at customers@kxtickets.com.

Returning to Wembley Park this Easter is the travelling immersive art installation Colourscape. From 8 – 13 April 2020, visitors can walk through a labyrinth of colour and light while enjoying live performances by musicians and dancers.

Colourscape was originally created by artist Peter Jones in the early ’70s and has previously popped up at the Vienna Festival of Youth, Cologne for the World Cup and Turku for European Capital of Culture. The installation is comprised of a series of interlinked, kaleidoscopic chambers. As visitors stroll through the maze of light, they will be met by musicians playing instruments from Tibet, China and Mongolia. Guests will be given coloured capes to wear so they blend into the interactive tunnel of colour.

Returning to Wembley for the second year running, this year’s Colourscape will be supporting learning disability charity Brent Mencap.

  • Colourscape takes place from 8 – 13 April 2020. At Wembley Park Boulevard (next to London Designer Outlet), Wembley, HA9 0FD. Nearest stations: Wembley Park or Wembley Stadium. Open 11am-4.30pm (sessions last 30 mins). Tickets (must be pre-booked): Adults £5, Children £3. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Wheelchair accessible. No dogs allowed. For more information, visit the Wembley Park website.

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Brighten up dark nights with interactive, light art installations at Winterfest at Wembley Park

The Sonic Runway will be one of the installations during Winterfest
© Jordan Laboucane

Lighting up the dark, cold nights this autumn is a new light festival at Wembley Park. Winterfest kicks off on 20 November 2019 and transform the area into an expanse of light, sound and colour. Guests will be able to move around the park and interact with the installations, creating plenty of Insta-moments to capture.

One of the highlights will be the light-art installation Sonic Runway, making its European debut following its success at Nevada’s Burning Man festival. Located on Olympic Way, the piece features music rippling down a 100-metre corridor of 32 concentric rings, with the light patterns moving at the speed of sound. During the launch night, the installation will be accompanied by a bespoke music soundtrack in partnership with Boxpark Wembley. Following the switch-on, guests can head to nearby Boxpark to chose from over 20 street food stalls and entertainment, including the world’s first free-roam virtual reality e-gaming arena.

Other installations includes the ‘Murmuration of Hopes’ light by architectural designer Elyne Legarnisson and digital scenographer Aurelien Lafargue. The commission is displayed across 15 huge LED banners and across the trees, with digital ‘birds’ perching on them. London’s tallest-ever LED Christmas tree will be unveiled, standing tall at 25-metres and including over 100,000 low-energy coloured lights. Meanwhile, you can enjoy the sounds of ‘Illumaphonium: Halo’, a series of eight, 3-metre music installations by musician and inventor Michael Davis. Visitors can interact and created music together. There will also be plenty of Instagrammable photo moments waiting, including the ‘LoveSpot… Under the Mistletoe’, a heart sculpture adorned with mistletoe and pulsating red lights; ‘Star Box’, a gift shaped cube, filled with golden lights and shimmering sequins; and ‘Saturation Surge’, a bold, colourful and geometric piece by street artist Maser.

As well as the art installations, there will be series of live music performances every weekend throughout November and December. Meanwhile, theatre fans can head to the new Troubadour Wembley Park Theatre to see the touring production of hit musical Fame from 21 December – 26 January 2020.

  • Winterfest runs from 20 November 2019 – 3 January 2020. Free admission. At Wembley Park, Wembley, HA9 0FD. Nearest stations: Wembley Park or Wembley Stadium. For more information, visit the Wembley Park website.

For a guide to what else is on in London in January 2020, click here.

For a guide to London’s outdoor ice rinks this festive season, click here.

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The Poppies return to London as the Weeping Window comes to the Imperial War Museum

Mirror, mirror, on Covent Garden’s walls: The new Reflect London installation

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2016

The north-east corner of Covent Garden market hall has been wrapped in an art installation Reflect London

Covent Garden is one of the most popular parts of London, a draw to tourists and city-dwellers alike for its shops, restaurants, entertainers and history. The 19th century market hall has seen many businesses come and go and is ever evolving with the changing demands from consumers. Following the opening of The Ivy Market Grill in late 2014, another fine dining establishment is coming to Covent Garden next year – a second London branch of SushiSamba. Taking over the former Opera Terrace restaurant, work has begun on transforming the north-east corner of the neo-classical market hall into the capital’s latest dining establishment.

While Londoners are used to seeing unsightly scaffolding during the frequent building works around town, the renovation for SushiSamba is going to be rather more gentle on the eyes. Launched this month is a new installation entitled Reflect London, which will conceal building works on the Grade II-listed building. The columns and façade of the building have been wrapped in 32,000 square feet of mirrored surfaces, giving a new perspective of the building and its surrounding environment.

  • Reflect London will be on at Covent Garden from April 2016 for an estimated eight months. Covent Garden Piazza, Covent Garden, WC2E. Nearest station: Covent Garden, Holborn or Leicester Square.

For a review of the original London branch of SushiSamba in the Heron Tower, click here.

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Confuse your senses at Ann Veronica Janssens’ States Of Mind installation yellowbluepink

Up in the air | 100,000 giant balloons fill Covent Garden Market for Charles Petillon’s installation

Carsten Höller – Decision review | Interactive art, flying machines and slides

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2015

Soar above the roofs at the Southbank on the flying machines at Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2015

Forget the gift shop, exit down the slides instead

Most of the time, going to an art exhibition means keeping a safe distance from the art in question and definitely no touching. However, that all changes with Belgium-born artist Carsten Höller’s new exhibition Decision, which opened last month at the Hayward Gallery.

This new exhibition explores perception and decision-making. From the beginning, you are given the first of many decisions to make – to go through Door A or Door B. The door we chose immediately plunged us into darkness so we had to rely on our sense of touch, gingerly walking along the sloped dark tunnels while touching the walls. While it was very disorienting, it was fun, although I was glad to eventually reach the light again.

The first room in the gallery kick stars the theme of a suspended reality. The room contains Flying Mushrooms, which invites the visitor to be part of the machinery which sends them spinning above our heads. Another room contains a huge pile of white and red pills which are dropping from the ceiling. There’s no sign to say what they are so if you can, put your trust in the artist that they won’t be harmful and swallow one if you wish.

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2015

Get transported into another world with the virtual reality headgear

One of the big draws has been the robotic beds, which glide around a dark room. People can actually pay £300 to spend the night on one. In the same room, are virtual reality headsets which transport you into a dark, snowy forest. The headset left me feeling confused, dizzy and a bit freaked out. Another dizzying experience was the Upside Down Goggles, which had my friends and I stumbling around a balcony looking at the London skyline from upside down, which was very clever.

For those with a sense of adventure, there’s two interactive pieces to give you a thrill. Two flying machines on  one of the balconies see you strapped into a hand glider-style frame with a safety harness ensuring you won’t fall. Unfortunately, there was a bit of a wait and my visit to the exhibition was within a strict time frame as I had plans afterwards so didn’t get the chance to try. There was a queue of about an hour and riders are given a substantial amount of time to fly above the rooftops, so bear this is mind if you want to try it out. Finally, to exit the exhibition you are given the option of sliding down the Isometric Slides – picking left or right. I was actually surprised by how fast I went down and the slides gave me more of an adrenalin rush than I anticipated.

Overall, it was a fun way to spend an hour or two. It was definitely a very different experience than I am used to having from an art exhibition. I really felt like all my senses have been fully exercised in different ways.

  • Carsten Höller: Decision runs at the Hayward Gallery until 6 September 2015. Tickets: Adults £13.50-£15, Students £11. Hayward Gallery, Belvedere Road, Southbank, SE1 8XX. Nearest station: Waterloo. For information and tickets, visit the Southbank Centre website.

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Hop along: Giant rabbits ‘Intrude’ upon the Southbank

Take My Lightning But Don’t Steal My Thunder in Covent Garden

Remembering the fallen | Marking the WW1 centenary with poppies at the Tower Of London