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Broken Shaker pop-up comes to Madison for London Cocktail Week

© Broken Shaker BAD ATTITUDE

A Bad Attitude (Toasted Coconut Bacardi 4 yr, Campari, Sweet Vermouth, House Mango Vinegar) at Broken Shaker, which is bringing a pop-up to London for Cocktail Week

If you’ve been to Miami in the past few years, you’ve probably heard of The Broken Shaker. Originally launched as a pop-up in 2012, it’s now a fully-fledged permanent drinking spot at the Freehand Hotel and was No.17 on the 2017 list of the World’s Best Bars. Its team have already wowed Chicago, Los Angeles and New York and now it’s finally crossing the Atlantic just in time for London Cocktail Week 2018.

This Miami Beach hotspot will be bringing its eclectic Florida vibes to the capital for an exclusive pop-up at Madison London. From 2 – 5 October 2018, The Broken Shaker’s East Coast bar director Bobby Eldridge will be creating a bespoke drinks menu for the rooftop destination in the City of London.

Guests can expect a little slice of Miami in an urban oasis with sweeping views of St Paul’s Cathedral and the Square Mile. The team behind the Broken Shaker are bringing some Miami heat with its signature ‘backyard’ tropical décor. The special menu will feature a mix of local and exotic ingredients, overseen by Miami’s top female bartender Courtney Lane.

Among the concoctions will be the grapefruit and garden shrub-infused Lion’s Club, whiskey-based Thai Tea Sazerac, and Coco-nut Case (Olmeca Altos Plata Tequila, Koko Kanu, fresh lime, kaffir agave and a coconut citrus sea salt rim). Also on offer will be the Broken Shaker’s signature aperitifs such as the Mocha Negroni (tequila, vanilla and grapefruit-infused Sancho’s Special), and the Fair and Square (peanut butter-washed Bulleit Rye, dark chocolate-infused Hennessy, red Vermouth, Benedictine and bitters).

  • The Broken Shaker at Madison runs from 2-5 October 2018. At Madison (6th floor), One New Change, New Change, City of London, EC4M 9AF. Nearest station: St Paul’s or Mansion House. Open Tues-Thu 11am-late, Fri 11am-1am. For more information, visit Madison’s website. For more information about London Cocktail Week (1-7 October 2018), visit Drink Up London.

For the latest guide to what’s on in London, click here.

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Millennium Bridge: A piece of modern London, aka the wobbly bridge

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

The Millennium Bridge links the Southbank to the City of London

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

Gateway to a London landmark: The bridge leads to St Paul’s Cathedral

London is one of the oldest and most iconic cities in the world. While there are – admittedly very few – pieces of Roman London left, the capital is full of architecture from across the centuries – an amalgamation of old and new. When tourists visit London, they tend to head to the older parts of the city, such as the Tower of London or Buckingham Palace. When it comes to newer additions to the capital, it can take a while for us Londoners to embrace them. Even several decades later, many still hate the Brutalist architecture on the Southbank, while others have slowly grown to love it.

One of London’s newest landmarks is the Millennium Bridge – the steel suspension footbridge spanning the River Thames, linking the Tate Modern to St Paul’s Cathedral. The bridge was one of three structures built in the capital to commemorate the Millennium – along with the London Eye and Millennium Dome (best known now as the O2 Arena). Unfortunately, both the Eye and Bridge fell prey to technical issues and ended up opening later than planned, which I remember was quite embarrassing for us Londoners at the time.

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

The bridge links the City with London’s former entertainment hub Bankside

The bridge was the result of a competition in 1996, with Arup, Foster and Partners and Sir Anthony Caro submitting the winning design. Construction on the Millennium Bridge started in late 1998. The bridge is comprised of three sections, 4 metres wide and 325 metre long. The structure includes eight suspension cables tensioned to pull a force of 2,000 tons. The north and south part of the bridges feature slopes, rather than stairs, meaning it is accessible for everyone.

The bridge finally opened on 10 June 2000 – two months later than scheduled and £2.2million over budget, bringing the total cost to £18.2million. However, two days later it was closed after the bridge began to sway while people were crossing it. This instability lead to the public and media dubbing it the ‘wibbly wobbly bridge’ – which has stuck as a nickname for many Londoners. Finally, the bridge was re-opened on 22 February 2002 after a £5million operation to fix the structure in place. Nearly 12 years later, it appears the Millennium Bridge is very much secure and has yet to ‘wibble wobble’ again.

  • The Millennium Bridge is accessible from Bankside in front of the Tate Modern or Peter’s Hill. Nearest tube/train: Blackfriars, Mansion House and London Bridge.
© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2014

Arty: The bridge leads straight to the Tate Modern


For the history of London Bridge, click here.

For a post on another Millennium landmark, read Metro Girl’s Must Do Series – Part 1: London Eye.

For a review of a cruise down the River Thames, read Just cruisin’: Sailing down the Thames.

To read about the history of the so-called ‘Christopher Wren House’ beside the Tate Modern, read Cardinal’s Wharf: A survivor of 18th century Bankside amidst two London landmarks

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Every which way: Endless Stair by the Tate Modern

Eerie shadow of St Paul’s Cathedral on the sky

© Memoirs Of A Metro Girl 2013

Eerie: A shadow of St Paul’s Cathedral dome on the sky

Tonight I was out in the City of London for dinner and a spot of theatre. I’ve heard about the roof terrace at One New Change and popped up in the lift to the sixth floor to check it out. Although the sky was overcast, it was a lovely view of St Paul’s, The Shard, Oxo Tower and more. However, a few hours later, once the ‘sun’ (cough cough) had gone down, we were passing One New Change on our way home so couldn’t resist popping back up to the terrace for another perspective at night. Bizarrely, thanks to what I assume was a combination of low cloud cover and the powerful lights on St Paul’s, there was actually a silhouette, shadow of the iconic dome on the sky. I must confess it was very strange, and slightly eerie and I’m glad I had my proper camera on me to capture the shot.

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